Frank Peter Zimmermann

Violin

Frank Peter Zimmermann is widely regarded as one of the foremost violinists of his generation.  Praised for his selfless musicality, his brilliance and keen intelligence he has been performing with all major orchestras in the world for well over three decades, collaborating on these occasions with the world’s most renowned conductors. His many concert engagements take him to all important concert venues and international music festivals in Europe, the United States, Asia, South America and Australia.

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Frank Peter Zimmermann is widely regarded as one of the foremost violinists of his generation. Praised for his selfless musicality, his brilliance and keen intelligence he has been performing with all major orchestras in the world for well over three decades, collaborating on these occasions with the world’s most renowned conductors. His many concert engagements take him to all important concert venues and international music festivals in Europe, the United States, Asia, South America and Australia.

Highlights during the 2020/21 season include engagements with the Berliner Philharmoniker and Kirill Petrenko, the Bayerisches Staatsorchester and Vladimir Jurowski, the Staatskapelle Dresden and Daniele Gatti, the Tonhalle Orchester and Paavo Järvi, the London Philharmonic Orchestra and Karina Canellakis and the Münchner Philharmoniker and Pablo Heras-Cassado. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic scheduled appearances with among others the Boston Symphony Orchestra and the Cleveland Orchestra have been postponed to a later season.
With pianist Martin Helmchen he is performing the complete or partial Beethoven sonata cycle in various major cities in Europe. In November 2020 BIS Records released their first of three CD’s with the 10 Beethoven sonatas; the remaining two CD’s will be released in 2021.

In 2010 he formed the Trio Zimmermann with viola player Antoine Tamestit and cellist Christian Poltéra; the trio has been performing in all major music centres and festivals in Europe. BIS Records released award-winning CD recordings of works for string trio by Beethoven, Mozart, Schubert, Schoenberg and Hindemith. May 2019 saw the release of the recording of the Goldberg Variations by J.S. Bach.

Over the years Frank Peter Zimmermann has built up an impressive discography for EMI Classics, Sony Classical, BIS Records, hänssler CLASSIC, Ondine, Decca, Teldec Classics and ECM Records. He has recorded virtually all major concerto repertoire, ranging from Bach to Ligeti, as well as recital repertoire. Many of these highly acclaimed recordings have received prestigious awards and prizes worldwide. Most recent releases include the two violin concertos of Martinů with the Bamberger Symphoniker and Jakub Hrůša, coupled with the solo sonata of Bartók (BIS); the two violin concertos of Shostakovich with the NDR Elbphilharmonie Orchester and Alan Gilbert (BIS; nominated for a Grammy Award); and the violin concertos of J.S. Bach with the Berliner Barock Solisten (hänssler CLASSIC).

Mr. Zimmermann has given four world premieres: Magnus Lindberg’s violin concerto no. 2 with the London Philharmonic Orchestra and Jaap van Zweden (2015) with further performances with the Berliner Philharmoniker and Swedish Radio Symphony Orchestra, both under Daniel Harding and with the New York Philharmonic and Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France, both under Alan Gilbert. He also premiered the violin concerto “en sourdine” by Matthias Pintscher with the Berliner Philharmoniker and Peter Eötvös (2003), the violin concerto “The Lost Art of Letter Writing” by Brett Dean, who received the 2009 Grawemeyer Award for this composition, with the Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, conducted by the composer (2007) and the violin concerto no. 3 “Juggler in Paradise” by Augusta Read Thomas with the Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France and Andrey Boreyko (2009).

He received a number of special prizes and honours, among which the “Premio del Accademia Musicale Chigiana, Siena” (1990), the “Rheinischer Kulturpreis” (1994), the “Musikpreis” of the city of Duisburg (2002), the “Bundesverdienstkreuz 1. Klasse der Bundesrepublik Deutschland” (2008) and the “Paul-Hindemith-Preis der Stadt Hanau” (2010).

Born in 1965 in Duisburg, Germany, Mr. Zimmermann started playing the violin when he was 5 years old, giving his first concert with orchestra at the age of 10. He studied with Valery Gradov, Saschko Gawriloff and Herman Krebbers.

Mr. Zimmermann plays on the 1711 Antonio Stradivari violin “Lady Inchiquin”, which is kindly provided by the Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, Düsseldorf, “Kunst im Landesbesitz”.

Representation

General Management: Nymus Artists
Germany: Michael Kocyan Artists Management
Spain: Duetto Management

Links & downloads


Concerts

  • January 10, 2021, 2:30 pm
    Monte-Carlo, Monaco
    Auditorium Rainier III
    Orchestre Philharmonique de Monte-Carlo
    Conductor: Kazuki Yamada
    Schumann – Violin Concerto in d minor, WoO 23

    https://www.opmc.mc
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Reviews

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“Er hat alles, was einen wirklich großen Künstler ausmacht, und das ist: Man bekommt, was man erwartet und ist gleichzeitig…” →“Er hat alles, was einen wirklich großen Künstler ausmacht, und das ist: Man bekommt, was man erwartet und ist gleichzeitig fasziniert, wie perfekt das Ergebnis alles Erwartete übertrifft, wie ein Künstler aus allseits Bekanntem wie Mozarts Violinkonzerten jenes Quantum Glück herauskitzelt, das man sich seit David Oistrakh so oft erhofft hat.” ←
– Süddeutsche Zeitung , 17/02/2015
“Throughout the performance the violinist was in full command of the piece’s sawing and darting passages. His tone, in the…” →“Throughout the performance the violinist was in full command of the piece’s sawing and darting passages. His tone, in the process, displayed a variety of colors, from dusky low notes to high phrases laced in silver. The second movement of the concerto is one of Bartók’s most beautiful passages. There, Zimmermann found the hints of yearning romanticism, unwinding the line with a singing tone that was answered with soft a blanket of sound by the BSO strings. The quicker section moved with a fittingly awkward, impish gate, and the third movement moved with an off-kilter lilt. The violinist’s gnarly runs, there, took on a fiery energy. Zimmermann’s blazing encore, Ernst Schliephake’s transcription of Rachmaninoff’s Prelude in G minor, Op. 23, No. 5, put a finishing touch on a thoroughly dramatic performance.” ←
– Boston Classical Review, 14/10/2016